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.jse File Virus


This page was created to help you remove the .Jse file virus from your system. There has been a sudden influx of virus-infested archives being sent on Facebook via trickery. We saw a lot of international users asking questions like “.jse é virus,” “comment .jse,” “archivos .jse,” prompting us the explore the issue.

If you are on this page, then you have either fallen prey to this, or someone else in your personal circle has. We created this article specifically to help you understand all of this and provide step by step instructions on how to remove .jse file virus.

Without further ado, let us get down to the matter at hand: the .jse file virus is a form of malware that exploits the human element in the PC equation. There are several important factors that you absolutely need to remember, mainly:

  • You will see several topics on the internet where people wholeheartedly will advise you to contact Facebook (as it is the primary source the malware is distributed through). Facebook is in fact NOT infected. Your PC is. Contacting Facebook is a complete waste of time. If you feel the need to do anything at all, we advise you to circulate a post warning people of the danger 
  • The .jse file virus exploit basically serves as a backdoor: it makes your PC into a part of a botnet for the malware creators. Its primary functions  are to open you up for later use and infect as many other PCs as possible. This is incredibly dangerous, as you are basically at the mercy of the malware creators.
  • It is particularly worrying that this piece of malware uses javascript – javascript recently came into the spotlight for being used to disseminate Ransomware. It is clear the .jse viruses can do a lot more harm than you are presently seeing.

 At the moment the one thing that’s particularly nasty, is that there is very little information to go on. There are many people asking at which point the malware can take a hold of you – when you open the link, download the archive, or open the archive. The truth is we don’t know, as the threat is too new. However the consensus up until now is that you are safe as long as you only click the link. However do not in any way interact with the files themselves.

Exploit kits of this kind are very slippery and particularly dangerous. Much of the time users tend to ignore them because they keep down to a dormant state, but in reality are particularly vicious, because whoever created it also likely has a keylogger installed on your system. This means any passwords you have can be recorded if you simply input them. To take advantage of this “feature”, malware creators usually reset your browsing cookies so that any “remembered” accounts have to be cleanly input again. 

SUMMARY:

Name Does not have an official name, but operates through .jse files
Type Rootkit
Detection Tool

.jse File Virus Removal

You are dealing with a malware infection that can restore itself unless you remove its core files. We are sending you to another page with a removal guide that gets regularly updated. It covers in-depth instructions on how to:
1. Locate and scan malicious processes in your task manager.
2. Identify in your Control panel any programs installed with the malware, and how to remove them. Search Marquis is a high-profile hijacker that gets installed with a lot of malware.
3. How to clean up and reset your browser to its original settings without the malware returning.
You can find the removal guide here.

For mobile devices refer to these guides instead: Android, iPhone

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About the author

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Violet George

Violet is an active writer with a passion for all things cyber security. She enjoys helping victims of computer virus infections remove them and successfully deal with the aftermath of the attacks. But most importantly, Violet makes it her priority to spend time educating people on privacy issues and maintaining the safety of their computers. It is her firm belief that by spreading this information, she can empower web users to effectively protect their personal data and their devices from hackers and cybercriminals.

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