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Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website


Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website

“Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website” is a harmful Windows program capable of infiltrating your computer and taking control of its settings and processes. Experts define “Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website” as a Trojan horse virus – a type of malware threat known for its stealthiness and wide range of harmful abilities.

Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website

With the help of multiple VirusTotal scanners we see the nature of the “Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website” Email.

A big number of our users have reported receiving this threatening email:

I know, xxx, is your password. You don’t know me and you’re thinking why you received this e mail, right?

Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website and guess what, you visited this web site to have fun (you know what I mean). While you were watching the video, your web browser acted as a RDP (Remote Desktop) and a keylogger which provided me access to your display screen and webcam. Right after that, my software gathered all your contacts from your Messenger, Facebook account, and email account.

What exactly did I do?

I made a split-screen video. First part recorded the video you were viewing (you’ve got a fine taste haha), and next part recorded your webcam (Yep! It’s you doing nasty things!).

What should you do?

Well, I believe, $1900 is a fair price for our little secret. You’ll make the payment via Bitcoin to the below address (if you don’t know this, search “how to buy bitcoin” in Google).

BTC Address:

bc1qzl2qlywq8fzfm49e7mvsuz4yvpdwpzfqs5g85r

(It is cAsE sensitive, so copy and paste it)

Important:

You have 24 hours in order to make the payment. (I have an unique pixel within this email message, and right now I know that you have read this email). If I don’t get the payment, I will send your video to all of your contacts including relatives, coworkers, and so forth. Nonetheless, if I do get paid, I will erase the video immidiately. If you want evidence, reply with “Yes!” and I will send your video recording to your 5 friends. This is a non-negotiable offer, so don’t waste my time and yours by replying to this email.

Usually, virus programs like this one don’t get noticed until it’s too late (or ever). However, if you currently have a reason to think your computer may have been invaded by “Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website”, you may still stand a chance to prevent this threat from causing any irreversible damage. However, you need to act quickly and very carefully. At the bottom of this post, you will be provided with a detailed guide that will explain to you the steps you ought to take in order to find the malware that’s hiding in your computer and eliminate it. In addition, you will find a recommended removal program in the guide that you can use in case the manual instructions turn out to be insufficient or if you’d prefer to do things automatically and without tampering with your computer’s settings. Before you get to the guide, however, we strongly recommend that you spend a couple more minutes on finishing this article as it will give you more information about the threat you may be facing at the moment.

Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website and guess what

Trojans like “Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website and guess what, you visited this web site to have fun” are versatile hacker tools and they are normally used for a wide variety of criminal tasks. One of the most common examples of what a Trojan can be used for is espionage.

Viruses like “Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website” are usually able to secretly gather all kinds of sensitive data from the computers they infect. Credit or debit card numbers, social insurance information, personal details, private conversations, work-related data, photos, videos, and more. Depending on the information the Trojan is able to get to, the hackers could use the gathered data in different ways, blackmailing, banking theft, and personal harassment being the most common.

One other thing Trojans are very good at is taking over the computer and forcing it to execute tasks and run processes without the user’s permission. This could allow the hackers to mine huge amounts of Bitcoin using all the computers they’ve infected. Also, the attacked machines could also be used for spreading spam, conducting DDoS attacks, and more.

Ransomware-distribution is the third common use of viruses like “Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website” that we’d like to tell you about. Since most Trojans can infect a computer without showing any symptoms, they are the perfect tools for delivering additional malware, such as Ransomware, to the user’s computers.

How to keep Trojans away

The main method used to spread these viruses is the use of disguise that’s supposed to trick the user into downloading the virus. The Trojan may be disguised as an email attachment, a program download, a browser extension, or a software update. In order to avoid these, use your common sense while browsing, never download new software from unreliable or illegal sources, and only install updates from the original developer of the program you are about to update. Also, keep away from any sketchy sites or the ads that they display.

SUMMARY:

Name “Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website”
Type Trojan
Detection Tool

Remove Well, I actually placed a malware on the porn website Email 

You are dealing with a malware infection that can restore itself unless you remove its core files. We are sending you to another page with a removal guide that gets regularly updated. It covers in-depth instructions on how to:
1. Locate and scan malicious processes in your task manager.
2. Identify in your Control panel any programs installed with the malware, and how to remove them. Search Marquis is a high-profile hijacker that gets installed with a lot of malware.
3. How to clean up and reset your browser to its original settings without the malware returning.
You can find the removal guide here.

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About the author

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Brandon Skies

Brandon is a researcher and content creator in the fields of cyber-security and virtual privacy. Years of experience enable him to provide readers with important information and adequate solutions for the latest software and malware problems.

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